Eric Burns: The escalating impact of property taxes on the middle class

The middle class is being squeezed out of Boulder. Growth in government spending, funded by rapid increases in property taxes, is a primary cause.  Increasing property valuations are fantastic for taxing entities, as they fund growth in government and government services.

As property taxes increase significantly faster than incomes, the tax burden on the middle class grows. Ultimately long time homeowners cannot afford the property taxes and must sell their homes, driving a migration of the middle class out of Boulder.

Full Story: Eric Burns: The escalating impact of property taxes on the middle class – Boulder Daily Camera

Co-op Ordinance – A Bad Joke?

At first, I thought the  Co-op Ordinance idea was a bad joke. The City Council wants to allow 12-15 folks to live in a 2,000 square foot house. That’s 4 folks to a bedroom.
This is another shocking development from the City Council. Is there no concern for the quality of neighborhoods, parking, and noise?
While I appreciate the concern for the housing shortage in Boulder, this solution is only transferring the problem to neighborhoods, which are the backbone of what makes Boulder great. Putting 12 folks in one home will not so much make Boulder more affordable except for a few college students, but rather make property owners richer. The stated intentions of this Ordinance will actually have the opposite effect, and make rents go up significantly, effecting many families’ ability to rent or purchase a home in Boulder.
There are already 40,000+ folks commuting into Boulder everyday, so allowing a few dozen coops is no solution. If the City Council is truly so concerned about affordability and the housing shortage, they will slow new job growth into Boulder, fight for bringing rail transit into Boulder (we have been paying taxes on that already), and enact some form of rent control.
Brian Spielmann

ALERT: Developer seeks zoning change at 3303 Broadway (The People’s Clinic)

On December 1st at 6:00 P.M. at the Municipal Building at 1777 Broadway, the Planning Board will have a public hearing and then decide whether or not to recommend approving a developer’s proposal at 3303 Broadway (formerly known as The People’s Clinic) for 50 units and commercial/retail space. The developer is requesting a zoning change from “public” to RH-2, despite the Planning Department’s rejection of her proposal. Continue reading “ALERT: Developer seeks zoning change at 3303 Broadway (The People’s Clinic)”

Co-op Ordinance – Limit the Damage

John Dugene pointed out last week that the fix was already in on linkage fees long before the City Council “debated” the issue.  Now it is increasingly looking like the fix is also already in on the so-called “Cooperative Housing Ordinance”.  At their October 11th meeting, after dismissing or ignoring most concerns from neighborhood residents and granting the co-op activists more than they had originally asked for, the Council made it clear that they were not really interested in hearing more input from the community.  Now they are sending clear signals that the Co-op Ordinance will be approved on December 6th with little debate.  The only questions remaining are how much more the Council will give in to the co-op activists’ demands, and how much more damage they will inflict on the residential neighborhoods of Boulder. Continue reading “Co-op Ordinance – Limit the Damage”

Amanda Bickel: A flawed proposal at 3303 Broadway

One group of Boulder residents argues for dense development everywhere, in the hope that this will make the city more affordable.Others see the Boulder they love at risk of destruction from a “build baby build” ethos. Ultimately, Boulder must do what it can to strike a smart balance: neighborhood by neighborhood.

What makes the city so desirable is that it has been carefully planned. Our community group, Neighbors of 3303 Broadway, is thus deeply concerned to see a proposal that attempts to bypass sound planning: the redevelopment of the old People’s Clinic site at 3303 Broadway.

Full Story: Amanda Bickel: A flawed proposal at 3303 Broadway – Boulder Daily Camera

Complex questions loom for large-scale senior housing project on Boulder’s Mapleton Hill – Boulder Daily Camera

As is usually the case whenever a big commercial development is proposed in Boulder, the high-end senior housing complex planned for a 15-acre plot high atop Mapleton Hill has drawn the early ire of some neighbors worried about the project’s “fit” in the neighborhood.

Full Story: Complex questions loom for large-scale senior housing project on Boulder’s Mapleton Hill – Boulder Daily Camera

Harold Hallstein: Palo and Planning Board: A neighbor’s perspective

Boulder’s Planning Board recently approved a 44-unit development at 4525 Palo Parkway over a multi-stakeholder solution seeking 35 units and additional preserved riparian zone. The public should understand the special treatment afforded to the developer on this particular project.

Also known as “Dedicated Outlot E,” 4525 Palo Parkway was sold in 1986 for $10 by Pinecrest Homes Inc. to Boulder Valley School District for school purposes to serve the local community. For 29 years, the land remained platted under this dedication for school use only. Despite clear county code (both current and 1984 applicable code) the land was passed ultimately to Boulder Housing Partners without public hearings or formal vacation proceedings required for dedicated school lands. Both Planning Commission and Parks and Open Space Advisory Board were required to review the sale. Colorado Open Records Act requests show these reviews were never held. Despite a formal objection filed by the community, the city and county have declined to provide any material analysis or code legitimizing this taking of public lands and its subsequent transfer to a residential real estate developer.

Full Story: Harold Hallstein: Palo and Planning Board: A neighbor’s perspective – Boulder Daily Camera