Fines soon possible as Denver gears up to enforce short-term vacation rental rules – The Denver Post

The new year will bring the first threat of fines under Denver’s new vacation rental rules, and there appear to be plenty of potential targets. Six months into the city’s roll-out of short-term rental licensing, most people who rent rooms or homes on online services such as Airbnb and VRBO still have not gotten on board. That’s not a surprise. San Francisco, Portland, Ore., and other cities similarly have struggled to get most hosts to start collecting lodging taxes and obtain a license or permit. Such lags often persist for years.But next week, Denver licensing officials will begin holding out the threat of fines — topping out at $999 for repeated violations — though they say violations still will be met first with a warning.

Source: Fines soon possible as Denver gears up to enforce short-term vacation rental rules – The Denver Post

Jeff Schulz: Report from the Boulder World Council

I recently met with our council leadership who outlined their approach to governing Boulder: “To begin, rather than thinking of ourselves as just City Council, we recognize that we are the World Council, making our task huge. To fund this effort, we know that, similar to the way that kryptonite neutralizes Superman, the term “sustainability” neutralizes critical thinking by many of our citizens.

Read More: Jeff Schulz: Report from the Boulder World Council – Boulder Daily Camera

Nancy Haney: Collaboration required at 3303 Broadway

It is of primary importance to stress that the opponents of the current proposal at 3303 Broadway are not against residential development at that location. The developer, from Richmond, Va., has been developing there for over 20 years. Boulder is not Richmond. Our city requires a collaborative and inclusive approach to development.The supporters of the plan continually mention affordable and middle-income housing being built there. They say that they look forward to a mixed population in the neighborhood. Are 450-square-foot units rented for $1,250-$1,300 a month truly affordable?

Read More: Nancy Haney: Collaboration required at 3303 Broadway – Boulder Daily Camera

BNA’s Positions on the Co-op Ordinance 3rd Reading Jan. 3, 2017

BNA maintains that co-ops should be limited to only private equity co-ops and/or limited to high-density, mixed-use, and converted commercial/industrial/office zoning districts.  However, we understand that the City Council is determined to move forward with sweeping legislation to allow rental and non-profit co-ops, and co-ops in low and medium density residential zones. We wish to offer some ideas on areas that are still open for input from the public, in hopes of moderating the impacts of this ordinance. Continue reading “BNA’s Positions on the Co-op Ordinance 3rd Reading Jan. 3, 2017”

Looking for 12 People to start a “co-op”

Recently posted on craigslist:

$200 / 1000ft2Looking for 12 People to start a “co-op” (Downtown Boulder)

Looking for 12 people who would be willing to share a one bedroom apartment. The bedroom is large and will hold 6. 6 will also be in the living room. Utilities will be shared.

Continue reading “Looking for 12 People to start a “co-op””

Amy Webb: Planning Board got it right on 3303 Broadway

Recent editorials have criticized the unanimous decision of Boulder’s Planning Board and the planning staff to deny a developer’s proposal for 3303 Broadway (former People’s Clinic site). While I understand and support the need to create more middle-income units in Boulder, it is unclear if these critics took the time to review the hundreds of pages of background information, listen to voices on both sides, or spend time at the site to observe access, traffic, parking, and safety issues to develop an informed opinion.

Read More: Amy Webb: Planning Board got it right on 3303 Broadway – Boulder Daily Camera

Miriam Walker: No more cash in lieu

Everyone seems to agree that Boulder is changing rapidly and that it has become unaffordable for most of its workers to live here, resulting in an increasingly “missing middle.” There is a solution to this problem and it has been around for decades: “inclusionary housing.” Ironically, the city has an inclusionary housing ordinance and apparently little will to impose the intent of such ordinances (i.e. income diversity) on new housing developments.

Full Story: Miriam Walker: No more cash in lieu – Boulder Daily Camera