City Council – Planning Board Joint Study Session 1/24/17

The Boulder City Council and the Boulder Planning Board held a joint study session on January 24th, 2017.  Topic of discussion: the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan (BVCP)

Here’s the staff presentation: Presentation for PB and CC on Jan 24 2017

And here’s the video of the session:

Read the Daily Camera’s biased “reporting” on one aspect of this session: Boulder weighs what to do when moratorium on tall buildings expires

Boulder weighs what to do when moratorium on tall buildings expires – Boulder Daily Camera

It’s not clear what, exactly, the city will do in early April when the 2015 moratorium on taller buildings in many areas of Boulder expires. During a joint study session of the City Council and Planning Board on Tuesday night, the ordinance’s extension did not appear to be a sure thing. Only four of the nine council members supported extending the 2015 policy. Four others said they were unsure. Planning Board members were more strongly in favor, but also not settled as to how a potentially renewed ordinance would look.

Source: Boulder weighs what to do when moratorium on tall buildings expires – Boulder Daily Camera

Craig H. Jones: There’s no way to meet Boulder’s housing demand

Continued demands for affordable housing and limited growth in Boulder are demonstrably self-defeating. With 60,000 in-commuters and 40 percent of Boulder households experiencing stress in paying for housing, only expanding Boulder to house approximately 250,000 people will fully solve the housing issue.

Source: Craig H. Jones: There’s no way to meet Boulder’s housing demand – Boulder Daily Camera

Rick Adams and Sarah Bexell: Why Twin Lakes Matters 

A smallish parcel of grassland habitat that abuts Twin Lakes Open Space is being considered for destruction and development. To the untrained human eye, this parcel may seem an eyesores compared to the surrounding human-manicured landscapes. However, to the wildlife species that call it home, it is all they have. Even though these two parcels are not pristine or even historically natural, they provide resources in the form of food, shelter and safety. They are also part of a migration and dispersal corridor that is unique and irreplaceable.

Source: Rick Adams and Sarah Bexell: Why Twin Lakes Matters – Boulder Daily Camera

Peak Millennial? Cities Can’t Assume a Continued Boost From the Young – The New York Times

Over the next few years, demographic research shows, the growth in demand for urban living could stall.

The debate is full of contours and caveats, but it really boils down to this: Are large numbers of millennials really so enamored with city living that they will age and raise families inside the urban core, or will many of them, like earlier generations, eventually head to the suburbs in search of bigger homes and better school districts?

Full Story: Peak Millennial? Cities Can’t Assume a Continued Boost From the Young – The New York Times

Report from Planning Board Meeting January 19th

The Boulder Planning Board’s time on January 19, 2017 was spent on two subjects:

CU South

After hearing from 15 or more speakers, the board discussed their concerns/questions, identified several things that staff needs to address (from the quality & value of the CU/Flatirons Co. levee to the stability of the cliff on the West side of the property to whether we should plan for a 100 or 200 year flood), and agreed on a message for City Council (to be delivered at their joint Tues meeting). I did not take notes, but one major point is the need to address the BVCP guidance re NON-STRUCTURAL APPROACHES vs. a “High-Risk Dam” (an official category) that may or may not save lives in a more-than-hundred-year flood. There seemed to be consensus (as I understood it) that the only leverage with CU would be in real negotiations based on annexation AND flood control.

BVCP Policy drafts re housing/land use

Staff previewed the presentation for the joint City Council / Planning Board Study Session on January 24th, based on the results of their survey, meetings/workshops, and planning Board deliberations and I was delighted to see, among other things: a pilot of neighborhood plans, addressing the jobs–housing imbalance by changing some of the workplace zoning to residence or mixed zoning, and affordability of housing.

I think there will be things presented in the Tues meeting to be happy about. All the hard work of the Planning Board & BNA have, in my opinion, made a difference!

THE VIDEO of the meeting is here:

 

San Francisco Asks: Where Have All the Children Gone? – The New York Times

San Francisco has the lowest share of children of the country’s largest cities, a longstanding trend reinforced by a tech industry that skews young and single.

A report released on Tuesday by the San Francisco Planning Department said the building boom in the city, which for the most part has introduced more studios and one-bedroom apartments, was unlikely to bring in more families. For every 100 apartments in the city sold at market rates, the San Francisco school district expects to enroll only one additional student, the report said.

Full Story: San Francisco Asks: Where Have All the Children Gone? – The New York Times