Boulder City Council unmoved after reconsidering affordable housing linkage fee – Boulder Daily Camera

The City Council has reaffirmed a November decision to raise, by about 25 percent, the per-square-foot fee on commercial developers that helps pay for the creation and preservation of affordable housing in Boulder.

Before Tuesday’s meeting, Councilman Sam Weaver made a push for a reconsideration of the $15 fee, which he said Trump’s election demanded, because of the expected loss or cutting down of some affordable housing funding sources.

“We have clearly seen the direction this administration is going, and it’s not going to be beneficial for affordable housing,” Weaver said.

Morzel, Young and Weaver were the only council members who did not vote in favor of adopting the $12 fee on Tuesday.

Full Story: Boulder City Council unmoved after reconsidering affordable housing linkage fee – Boulder Daily Camera

The High Cost of a Home Is Turning American Millennials Into the New Serfs – The Daily Beast

American greatness was long premised on the common assumption was that each generation would do better than previous one. That is being undermined for the emerging millennial generation.

Continue reading “The High Cost of a Home Is Turning American Millennials Into the New Serfs – The Daily Beast”

Boulder County cities, towns eye regional approach to affordable housing – Boulder Daily Camera

Over the coming several months, Boulder County’s local governments are expected to consider signing off on, and participating in, a coordinated regional approach to addressing affordable housing needs…

“A regional approach is the way to solve the affordable housing problem,” said Boulder City Council member Mary Young. She said the proposal presented to her, Boulder Council member Jan Burton and other municipal representatives attending Wednesday’s Consortium of Cities meeting, “is a good start,” but it “could use some tweaking.”

Young said the draft regional plan should do more to recognize the relationships between residents’ housing and transportation needs and expenses, for example, and should not focus exclusively on the percentages of people’s income being spent on rental housing.

Full Story: Boulder County cities, towns eye regional approach to affordable housing – Boulder Daily Camera

Katie Wahr: CU South: Flood mitigation must be decoupled from annexation – Boulder Daily Camera

In a straw vote on Jan. 24, the City Council and Planning Board voted in favor of granting CU full annexation of their property in exchange for the erection of a high-hazard dam on the northeast side of the property (“Despite flood concerns, Boulder moving toward a CU South annexation,” Daily Camera, Jan. 27). Flood mitigation of this land is critical and necessary in order to prevent the flooding of the homes of downstream residents in a repeat event of the floods of September 2013. However, annexation of the entire property need not be tied to enactment of flood mitigation, and if we grant annexation of the entire property all at once, we lose our power as a community to have much say in what the future of that land holds. CU has released only vague information about what it is that they would like to build on the property, and in agreeing to full annexation at this point in time, we as a city are cutting short the site review that is typical in annexation agreements and losing our only opportunity to enforce land-use decisions.

Read More: Katie Wahr: CU South: Flood mitigation must be decoupled from annexation – Boulder Daily Camera

South Boulder Creek Flood Mitigation Plan

From the Boulder City Council Hotline, Feb 3 2017. From Mary Young

Sender: Young, Mary

Hello Colleagues on council and planning board as well as hotline subscribers, Deb Gardner and I both serve on the Urban Drainage and Flood Control District board of directors. After yesterday’s meeting we approached Ken MacKenzie, the executive director with some clarifying questions about CU south. Below is their response along with contacts regarding a potential BVCP groundwater policy. Thank you.

Mary Dolores Young
Boulder City Council

Continue reading “South Boulder Creek Flood Mitigation Plan”

Karen Hollweg: Height limit review – Boulder Daily Camera

Thanks to Alex Burness for covering the City Council-Planning Board session in “Boulder weighs tall buildings” (Daily Camera, Jan. 25) explaining that the council is weighing whether to end the moratorium that limits tall buildings to eight specific locations in Boulder and Gunbarrel.

This is clearly an issue that Boulderites care about. As staff showed at the meeting, the recent city survey showed that 71 percent of participants were opposed to allowing buildings taller than three stories (up to 55 feet) in additional locations in the city. Citizen comments included: “I have lived in a large city for much of my life. One of the reasons I chose to move to Boulder was its abundant natural beauty and smaller scale.” to “Leave the views!” and “The height of the new Daily Camera building is a travesty.” (This is the “Pearl West” building at 11th and Pearl.)

I thought that, in addition to Alex’s quotes from various council members, readers should know how they actually voted: Council member Bob Yates was the only one who voted to end the moratorium and move forward with allowing taller buildings in additional locations around the city. Council members Burton, Appelbaum, Brockett and Shoemaker were unsure about whether to do that. And council members Jones, Morzel, Weaver and Young were the only ones in tune with the 71 percent of the citizens and supported keeping the current policy that limits tall buildings.

Source: Karen Hollweg: Height limit review – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder City Council to limit open comment at meetings, pick speakers by lottery – Boulder Daily Camera

The previously endless open comment period at the onset of Boulder City Council meetings soon will be limited to 20 speakers who will be selected at random.

Council members formalized the plan during a study session Tuesday night that followed a much longer discussion at the group’s January retreat regarding various strategies for cutting down the length of meetings that regularly run up to or beyond midnight.

Citizens will not be limited in their ability to address the council during public hearings, and will now see expanded ability to give input on call-ups — development proposals that the council seeks to intervene on — deemed potentially controversial.

However, the open comment period at the beginning of each council meeting, during which members of the public can address their elected representatives on any items other than those already being addressed by public hearing, will be significantly curtailed.

Some council members also were uncomfortable with a trend that has seen especially heated public hearings preceded by parties in the Municipal Building below the meeting chambers. Ahead of recent hearings on co-op housing, for instance, dozens gathered for pizza — a sort of occupation that the council felt might make uncomfortable those with views differing from those packing the building lobby before proceedings begin. “That gauntlet downstairs recently has become challenging for some people,” Mayor Pro Tem Andrew Shoemaker said.

Source: Boulder City Council to limit open comment at meetings, pick speakers by lottery – Boulder Daily Camera