Rob Smoke: A strange rationale for a board appointment

I recently observed the Boulder City Council session where appointments were made to the Planning Board.

For one of the appointments, Bob Yates offered the following endorsement to one of the two highly pro-development candidates who were installed: “I know that he has…two children.” He didn’t simply say “I’ve met his family,” he instead said “I know that he has two children” as if that by itself were justification for his placement on the board.

Other members of council similarly had little to say about the same candidate. Someone offered, “I think he has some really good new ideas.”

Meanwhile, an individual who was slightly less pro-development was essentially removed from their seat on the Planning Board because … um … he did not have the right number of children? It might be unlikely that’s the reason, but it would make about as much sense as Bob’s reason for endorsing the new board member.

When will the residents of Boulder wake up to the fact that they are being had by moneyed interests with little or no stake in the long-term effects of rapid over-development?

Source: Rob Smoke: A strange rationale for a board appointment – Boulder Daily Camera

Nancy Haney: Lately things feel out of control

I do not often agree with Steve Pomerance writings. However his writing on March 26 spoke loudly to me.As a 40+ year resident of Boulder, I have been interested, then alarmed at the changes of late. Since my business has been closely related to growth, I have benefited from the growth in the past. Lately things have felt out of control.

His column of March 26 comforted me as it expressed so well my feelings about beautiful Boulder.

Source: Nancy Haney: Lately things feel out of control – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder to host open house about various downtown, University Hill projects – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder is hosting an open house on Wednesday to update the public on and gather input about projects occurring along the central stretch of Broadway as well as numerous projects on University Hill and the city’s Civic Area… The open house takes place at the North Boulder Recreation Center, 3170 Broadway, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

More: Boulder to host open house about various downtown, University Hill projects – Boulder Daily Camera

Jim Martin: Beauty of Boulder Valley has been its undoing – Boulder Daily Camera

Is this the end of Boulder as we know it?” Steve Pomerance asked in his March 26 opinion column in the Daily Camera. I can answer that: Yes, the old Boulder is dead, with recent developments delivering the final blows. This is greatly distressing to me, someone that has lived here since 1961 and who has seen the unstoppable changes that surgically remove a city’s charm.

Read More: Jim Martin: Beauty of Boulder Valley has been its undoing – Boulder Daily Camera

Paul Danish: Is this the end of Boulder as we know it? Yep

Former Boulder City Councilman Steve Pomerance had an op-ed piece in the Daily Camera last Sunday that appeared under the headline “Is this the end of Boulder as we know it?” The brief answer to the question is yes, and for the reasons Pomerance marshals. Pomerance’s thesis is that the basic charter amendments, ordinances and resolutions that have protected Boulder’s environment, character and quality of life for half a century are being systematically dismantled.

Read More: Is this the end of Boulder as we know it? Yep – Boulder Weekly

The Hogan-Pancost Development Proposal

Hogan-Pancost is a 22 acre parcel of vacant land in Southeast Boulder, immediately to the south of the East Boulder Community Center. Three different sets investors have been scheming to develop it for over 25 years!

The Southeast Boulder Neighborhoods Association (SEBNA) has successfully staved off development efforts for this entire time. But now, with the extreme pro-growth agenda in the City of Boulder, it is again in danger, perhaps more than ever. Both the City Council and now the Planning Board have been stacked in favor of extreme growth.

The parcel is in Zone II of the County, which currently allows for 2 homes to be built there. The current developer (the 3rd one) is working with the City to have the property annexed in to the City, making it eligible for the construction of well over 100 homes.

The hydrology in the area is very sensitive and the neighbors (and their hydrologist) believe that it is critical that this property remain as the catch basin for water during floods. The water table there is very high and variable and much of the surrounding area is in the 100 and 500 year flood plains. The area suffered extensively during the 2013 flood. Additionally, the City currently does not monitor or consider the water table when making development decisions. (They absolutely should.)

If development is allowed to occur, the Hogan-Pancost property will be elevated and it’s likely that the water will drain into the neighboring properties, jeopardizing the homes and lives of the nearby residents. This area should not be annexed but should remain in the County, zoned for very low or no development.

For more information visit the SEBNA website at www.seboulder.org, and also take a look at the City of Boulder’s Hogan-Pancost page.