Stanford Court plan for senior affordable housing delayed as developers rethink approach – Boulder Daily Camera

The review process for a proposed senior affordable housing project in south Boulder has been delayed, as developers consider a new arrangement with a slowed-down timeline.At 3485 Stanford Court, on the 5-acre site of Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Boulder Housing Partners and the local senior housing community Frasier have plans to build 45 one- and two-bedroom apartments — 100 percent of which would qualify as permanently affordable.

The project was set to go before the Boulder Planning Board for a public hearing and concept review on Thursday, but the applicants pulled out in order to reconsider a key aspect of the proposed deal.

What’s being rethought now is a detail in the plan that calls for Frasier to acquire the property from Mt. Calvary and have Boulder Housing Partners develop it. They would then lease space on-site back to the church for $1 per year for up to 15 years.

Source: Plan for south Boulder senior affordable housing delayed as developers rethink approach – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder looks to restore funding for anti-speeding projects in residential areas – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder transportation planners have presented a plan to change the process by which citizens can seek city-funded road treatments aimed at decreasing speeding in their neighborhoods.

The Neighborhood Speed Management Program, as it has been titled, would see Boulder’s budget allot money for the first time in 14 years to street engineering, such as speed humps and roundabouts, in residential areas and on non-arterial roadways.

It would replace the existing Neighborhood Traffic Mitigation Program.

Full Story: Boulder looks to restore funding for anti-speeding projects in residential areas – Boulder Daily Camera

Shoemaker bows out of City Council race – Boulder Daily Camera

Citing a desire to devote more time to his family and his career in law, Mayor Pro Tem Andrew Shoemaker said Monday that he will not be seeking re-election to the Boulder City Council this November.

Read More: Mayor Pro Tem Andrew Shoemaker says he won’t run again for Boulder City Council – Boulder Daily Camera

What No One Ever Tells You About Tiny Homes – NYTimes.com

My husband and I share a 492-square-foot apartment in Cambridge, Mass. We inhabit a “micro apartment,” or what is sometimes called a tiny house. This label is usually proudly applied to dwellings under 500 square feet, according to Wikipedia. We are unwittingly on a very small bandwagon, part of a growing international movement. But deep inside the expensive custom closets and under the New Age Murphy beds, the pro-petite propaganda has hidden some unseemly truths about how the other half lives.

No one writes about the little white lies that help sell this new, very small American dream.

Here, on the inside, we have found small not so beautiful after all. Like the silent majority of other middling or poor urban dwellers in expensive cities, we are residents of tiny homes not by design, but because it is all our money can rent.

Read More: What No One Ever Tells You About Tiny Homes – NYTimes.com

Affordable Housing Strategy, Development, Diversity | PBC

The Problem:  

Boulder is the most expensive city in the region. With average single-family home prices near one million dollars, and many apartments renting for thousands of dollars a month, it is not affordable for most middle-, median- and low-income households. The City of Boulder has implemented a variety of affordable housing policies to address the issue, yet we continue to lose ground. Job growth continues to outpace residential growth causing upward pressure on housing prices, the local real estate market continues to skyrocket, and existing housing that is still relatively affordable is being redeveloped as high-end. If the current development trends continue, Boulder will be a place for mostly the very wealthy and a few lower income people in subsidized units.

Full Story: PBC

Steve Pomerance: Don’t do flood planning using the rear view mirror – Boulder Daily Camera

Back almost 30 years ago, when I was on the City Council, we engaged in a very detailed study of the major drainages that flow through Boulder, and the likely damage that could result from floods. Our objective was to come up with appropriate risk mitigation standards… Out of this study came Boulder’s regulatory standard using the 100-year and 500-year flood maps and also the high hazard areas, which were based on such flows.

Setting the rules based on these standards was a compromise. The council did end up requiring some buildings that were at very serious risk to be torn down. But buildings in areas at somewhat lower risk were left in place, even though they never should have been built in the first place.

The current regulations need some serious updating. First, they are not appropriate for areas where development can be avoided; they were created for already-developed areas, and so compromise the level of protection. Second, the frequency/intensity forecasts are really just educated guesses because the historic events are so infrequent, so they form a weak basis for doing quantitative risk assessment. Third, and critically important, the climate is changing, so we can expect more and more intense flood events.

Source: Steve Pomerance: Don’t do flood planning using the rear view mirror – Boulder Daily Camera

Kristin Bjornsen: Uphold the open space designation at CU South

In the CU South debate, there’s one pesky fact that keeps getting buried. Well, actually, there are dozens, but the one that boggles my mind the most is this: In 1996, CU knowingly purchased 220 acres of unincorporated, open space-designated land on the South Boulder Creek floodplain…

Now CU is demanding that the city and county remove the open space designation, annex the land, and give CU almost carte blanche to build whatever it would like. This is a little bit like someone buying a chicken and demanding City Council transform it into a goose that lays golden eggs. Except CU wants a whole flock of golden geese…

Read More: Kristin Bjornsen: Uphold the open space designation at CU South – Boulder Daily Camera