No call-up: Boulder council grants final OK to 1440 Pine St.

The proposed development at 1440 Pine St. was given final approval on Tuesday night, as the Boulder City Council declined an opportunity to call up the project for further discussion.

That decline upholds a 6-1 vote of the city Planning Board last month to approve the project, which will see a three-story building built on a surface parking lot just northeast of the Pearl Street Mall.

No call-up: Boulder council grants final OK to 1440 Pine St. http://www.dailycamera.com/news/boulder/ci_31043717/no-call-up-boulder-council-grants-final-ok

Boulder Planning Board produces expected outcome: approves housing for homeless young adults at 1440 Pine St.

Boulder Planning Board produces the result they were expected to produce: they approved housing for young homeless adults at 1440 Pine St.

After 18 months of community debate — often unusually heated, even by Boulder’s standards — the city Planning Board on Tuesday night approved a proposal to build housing for homeless young adults in a new downtown facility.

The board voted 6-1, with member Crystal Gray representing the lone voice of dissent.

Read the Full Story at the Daily Camerahttp://www.dailycamera.com/news/boulder/ci_31025612/boulder-board-approves-housing-homeless-at-1440-pine

Landlords Are Taking Over the U.S. Housing Market

As rising home prices, slow new home construction, and demographic shifts push homeownership rates to 50-year lows, the U.S. is increasingly a country of renters—and landlords.

Last year, 37 percent of homes sold were acquired by buyers who didn’t live in them, according to tax-assessment data compiled in a new report published by Attom Data Solutions and ClearCapital.com Inc.

Read more: Bloomberg.com

What if we just … made it stop? Constitutional amendment would impose residential growth limit along Colorado’s Front Range – Denverite

If you didn’t build it, would they not come? Here’s the proposal: In the Front Range counties of Denver, Broomfield, Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Douglas, El Paso, Jefferson, Larimer and Weld, building permits for new housing would be capped at just 1 percent of existing units for the years 2019 and 2020.

And that cap would continue thereafter unless the residents of individual cities and counties voted to overturn it.

In addition to limiting residential growth, the amendment would require that 30 percent of the housing that is allowed under the cap be affordable housing and affordable housing for seniors.

Full Story: What if we just … made it stop? Constitutional amendment would impose residential growth limit along Colorado’s Front Range – Denverite

Co-op Ordinance – Limit the Damage

John Dugene pointed out last week that the fix was already in on linkage fees long before the City Council “debated” the issue.  Now it is increasingly looking like the fix is also already in on the so-called “Cooperative Housing Ordinance”.  At their October 11th meeting, after dismissing or ignoring most concerns from neighborhood residents and granting the co-op activists more than they had originally asked for, the Council made it clear that they were not really interested in hearing more input from the community.  Now they are sending clear signals that the Co-op Ordinance will be approved on December 6th with little debate.  The only questions remaining are how much more the Council will give in to the co-op activists’ demands, and how much more damage they will inflict on the residential neighborhoods of Boulder. Continue reading “Co-op Ordinance – Limit the Damage”