How Anti-Growth Sentiment, Reflected in Zoning Laws, Thwarts Equality – NYTimes.com

The small city of Boulder, home to the University of Colorado’s flagship campus, has a booming local economy and a pleasantly compact downtown with mountain views. Not surprisingly, a lot of people want to move here.

Something else is also not surprising: Many of the people who already live in Boulder would prefer that the newcomers settle somewhere else.

Source: How Anti-Growth Sentiment, Reflected in Zoning Laws, Thwarts Equality – NYTimes.com

The author of that article followed it up with this posting on his Facebook Page, making his opinions and biases more obvious:

Ruth Wright: Boulder has worked to preserve its beauty

In a recent editorial, Dave Krieger stated: “Boulder is the crown jewel of one of America’s most attractive metropolitan areas . Although there are those in town who would like to take credit for this status, it is actually owed to a fabulous natural setting that is the work of God or nature, depending on your view.”

Most of us agree that we live in a fabulous natural setting. We do not presume to have created it. However, we have spent time and treasure in protecting and preserving it.

In September 1971 the city council adopted an ordinance to permit up to 50 buildings 140 feet high downtown and east to the Arapahoe and Crossroads Shopping Centers ! However, the citizens had already gathered enough signatures to put the 55-foot charter amendment on the November ballot. And the rest is history.

Source: Ruth Wright: Boulder has worked to preserve its beauty – Boulder Daily Camera