Steve Pomerance: Don’t do flood planning using the rear view mirror – Boulder Daily Camera

Back almost 30 years ago, when I was on the City Council, we engaged in a very detailed study of the major drainages that flow through Boulder, and the likely damage that could result from floods. Our objective was to come up with appropriate risk mitigation standards… Out of this study came Boulder’s regulatory standard using the 100-year and 500-year flood maps and also the high hazard areas, which were based on such flows.

Setting the rules based on these standards was a compromise. The council did end up requiring some buildings that were at very serious risk to be torn down. But buildings in areas at somewhat lower risk were left in place, even though they never should have been built in the first place.

The current regulations need some serious updating. First, they are not appropriate for areas where development can be avoided; they were created for already-developed areas, and so compromise the level of protection. Second, the frequency/intensity forecasts are really just educated guesses because the historic events are so infrequent, so they form a weak basis for doing quantitative risk assessment. Third, and critically important, the climate is changing, so we can expect more and more intense flood events.

Source: Steve Pomerance: Don’t do flood planning using the rear view mirror – Boulder Daily Camera

Kristin Bjornsen: Uphold the open space designation at CU South

In the CU South debate, there’s one pesky fact that keeps getting buried. Well, actually, there are dozens, but the one that boggles my mind the most is this: In 1996, CU knowingly purchased 220 acres of unincorporated, open space-designated land on the South Boulder Creek floodplain…

Now CU is demanding that the city and county remove the open space designation, annex the land, and give CU almost carte blanche to build whatever it would like. This is a little bit like someone buying a chicken and demanding City Council transform it into a goose that lays golden eggs. Except CU wants a whole flock of golden geese…

Read More: Kristin Bjornsen: Uphold the open space designation at CU South – Boulder Daily Camera

County Meeting on BVCP Update: DC Coverage

People with comments and suggestions about proposals for major updates to the Boulder Valley Comprehensive Plan can present their arguments during a joint Wednesday afternoon public hearing by the Boulder County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners.

Key Items:
4 Body Review Changes
CU South – Flood Mitigation

Read More: Boulder County commissioners, Planning Commission to hold hearing on comp plan changes

Susan Lambert: The stability of the four-body review process

The most important and time-tested component of American democracy is the concept of checks and balances. It ensures the interests of a few never override the values and interests of the larger community. It protects against corruption. It protects against tyranny.On June 13, Boulder City Council’s nine members met to contemplate eliminating Boulder County’s most important system of checks and balances: the BVCP’s four-body review process for land-use changes. Boulder’s four governing bodies are the county commissioners, county Planning Commission, City Council, and city Planning Board.

When the County Planning Commission (CPC) recently — and wisely — voted to maintain the existing density and reject Boulder County Housing Authority’s overreach at Twin Lakes, it sent shock waves through the halls of power in Boulder County — and the city. How dare this governing body listen to the people they serve? How dare they defy the back-door power plays of the county?

Read More: Susan Lambert: The stability of the four-body review process – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder advances compromise plan to limit county control over future city expansion – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder County Planning Commission would lose veto power on key parcels; County commissioners would not.

Boulder City Council listens to citizens
Boulder Mayor Suzanne Jones, middle, and Boulder City Council members Andrew Shoemaker, left, and Sam Weaver listen. (Paul Aiken / Daily Camera Staff Photographer)

City Council members, a slight majority of whom would like to limit Boulder County’s control over future city expansion, appear to have come to some agreement on a proposed revision to the procedure by which city and county cooperate on long-range, land-use planning.

In an unofficial straw-poll vote taken late Tuesday night, the council supported a compromise that would let the Board of County Commissioners retain veto power over changes to parcels in categories known as Area II and the Area III-Planning Reserve.

However, the Boulder County Planning Commission would lose its voice in those two areas, under the straw-poll plan.

Full Story: Boulder advances compromise plan to limit county control over future city expansion – Boulder Daily Camera

CU-South | PLAN Boulder County

Respected environmentalist Tim Hogan’s letter to the newspaper, outlining the issues.   For many longtime residents of Boulder, the current proposal from the university requesting annexation, engineered flood mitigation, and additions to their housing and academic building portfolio stirs up a host of reservations.  The more one delves into the details, the greater those reservations become.

Source: CU-South | PBC

Ben Binder: Neighborhoods held hostage by CU South

For 20 years, it has been known that hundreds of homes in south Boulder are in danger of flooding from South Boulder Creek, and the city has spent millions developing a $40 million plan to mitigate the problem. A major component of the plan is a detention pond west of U.S. 36 designed to store a flood’s peak flows and release them slowly over time…. CU’s strategy is to hold residents of Frasier Meadows and surrounding neighborhoods hostage and prevent any flood mitigation until it gets what it wants.

Source: Ben Binder: Neighborhoods held hostage by CU South – Boulder Daily Camera