Boulder City Council gets stricter on vacation rental enforcement – Boulder Daily Camera

A little more than one year ago, the Boulder City Council passed a new ordinance to govern short-term rentals, such as Airbnb and VRBO, which required that property owners have a license to rent to visitors.

On Thursday night, the City Council — much maligned for what many perceive as a lax approach to enforcement of neighborhood laws — approved a slate of changes to the ordinance they hope hold short-term rental owners even more accountable for their properties.

“The message we got from council was that you wanted proactive enforcement and you wanted a lot of it,” City Attorney Tom Carr said. The number of investigations carried out since June, he added, “is a lot.”

Source: Boulder City Council gets stricter on vacation rental enforcement – Boulder Daily Camera

Laura Osborn: Enforcement of over-occupancy lacking

I have repeatedly experienced a lack of interest on the part of city staff to investigate over-occupancy complaints. The sole city staff member assigned to this task spends a significant portion of his time thwarting requests, rather than being helpful. … When is the City Council going to direct city staff to enforce the allowed legal occupancy of rental units?

Full Story: Laura Osborn: Enforcement of over-occupancy lacking – Boulder Daily Camera

Mark Wallach: Boulder housing: law enforcement optional 

Prospective tenants at Sterling University Peaks apartments were told they would be occupying private bedrooms. But the fine print of the lease stated that they agreed to share a bedroom. How is it that these landlords are permitted to retain their rental license for one day more after behavior that is duplicitous at best towards the tenants, and fraudulent with respect to the city?

This selective and understaffed approach to law enforcement is one of the key elements in the growing neighborhood opposition to the city’s plans to expand the use of co-ops into low-density neighborhoods. In addition to the destructive impact on residential neighborhoods resulting from 10-12 unrelated individuals with cars living next door, the city has also made it amply clear that there will be no serious regulation of these living arrangements. If there is no enforcement now, when co-ops are few, what can we expect when they increase exponentially?

Full Story: Mark Wallach: Boulder housing: law enforcement optional – Boulder Daily Camera