Boulder considers changing developer requirement for affordable, middle-income housing – Boulder Daily Camera

Staff in the city’s Division of Housing are recommending a series of updates to the Boulder inclusionary housing program aimed at creating more units for middle-income earners and changing the requirements of developers who contribute to the local affordable housing stock.

Source: Boulder considers changing developer requirement for affordable, middle-income housing – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder extends height-limit ordinance for 15 months – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder developers who for the last two years have been barred from putting up buildings taller than 40 feet won’t regain the privilege for at least another 15 months.

In an 8-1 vote in which Bob Yates represented the lone voice of dissent, the Boulder City Council on Tuesday night decided that the city’s two-year moratorium on taller buildings, which expires in April, should be extended until July 19, 2018.

Continue reading “Boulder extends height-limit ordinance for 15 months – Boulder Daily Camera”

Denver Plans Its Future, Neighborhood By Neighborhood – 5280.com

A model for Boulder to consider? From Boulder Councilman Sam Weaver: “I would like to draw your attention to a local example of a subcommunity planning process operating in Denver that I hope we can replicate here in Boulder to get grassroots input into our planning efforts.  It is a way of managing process that I think can give more certainty for both developers and the residents in the areas near impending development.

Officially speaking, Denver contains 78 neighborhoods. Currently, 42 percent of them don’t have neighborhood plans, which are supposed to address everything from land use to transportation on a micro level. Most of the plans that do exist are more than 15 years old—and 15 years ago, Denver developers barely registered places like LoHi and RiNo. (The city still doesn’t recognize these districts as official ’hoods.) But under our cumbersome planning model, it would take nearly 80 years to upgrade or create blueprints.

Read More: Denver Plans Its Future, Neighborhood By Neighborhood at 5280.com

Uncertainty looms with height limits back on table in Boulder – Boulder Daily Camera

The 2015 ordinance that halted for two years consideration of tall buildings in most of Boulder is set to expire in a few weeks, and the community is watching closely as the City Council weighs whether to extend it, and for how long. On Tuesday night, the council will hold a public hearing on the matter…

One ordinance up for consideration, and recommended by city staff, would indefinitely extend the two-year moratorium approved in 2015 and expiring April 19…

Quality of life issue

A recent city survey showed that 71 percent of respondents are opposed to developers building up to or beyond 55 feet in parts of the city that aren’t already exempted from the ordinance, and many in Boulder have contacted officials in recent weeks to voice support for an ordinance extension…

Read More: Uncertainty looms with height limits back on table in Boulder – Boulder Daily Camera

When It Comes to Housing, Boulder Can’t Have It All – 5280.com

How can Boulder balance maintaining open spaces with its need for affordable housing?
For more than a year, Boulder County residents and government have squared off over a 20-acre stretch of land northeast of town. Tucked between residential housing and Twin Lakes Open Space in the unincorporated town of Gunbarrel, the Boulder County Housing Authority proposed a change to the Boulder County Comprehensive Plan—which has been in place since the 1970s and acts as a blueprint for the city’s growth—to allow an affordable housing development on this land, about 12 units per acre or around 200 units total, thus incorporating the area into Boulder city limits.

Source: When It Comes to Housing, Boulder Can’t Have It All – 5280.com

Boulder council discusses building housing, city offices on former Broadway hospital site – Boulder Daily Camera

City officials have often spoken of the huge opportunity Boulder has at the 8.8-acre former hospital site on Broadway, and of the need to “get it right” in redevelopment.

A study session of the City Council on Tuesday offered a peek at what getting it right may look like in the eyes of the planners and elected leaders tasked with turning the site, which the city purchased a year ago from Boulder Community Hospital for $40 million, into a community benefit.

The council showed a desire to investigate using the land, which sits just west of Broadway along Alpine and Balsam streets, to build a mix of housing types for different income levels, city offices and commercial space that includes bars and restaurants — all in a pedestrian-oriented layout.

The ongoing Alpine-Balsam conversation takes place within the context of a simultaneous exploration into the future of Broadway from University Hill to Iris.

At one point in the study session, Councilman Sam Weaver asked planners whether the city might inquire into a gondola as part of the Broadway plan. Chief Urban Designer Jim Robertson said that could be one of a number of tools Boulder looks at once it has actually solidified the city vision for the corridor.

Source: Boulder council discusses building housing, city offices on former Broadway hospital site – Boulder Daily Camera

City will spend $8 million to renovate an ex-Boulder Community Hospital building – Boulder Daily Camera

As an early step in the broad redevelopment of the former Boulder Community Hospital site on Broadway, Boulder plans to spend about $8 million to renovate one of the site’s buildings and use it for city offices. When the city bought the hospital site from BCH, which is now located in east Boulder, in December 2015 for $40 million, it acquired roughly 355,000 square feet of facilities and 800 parking spaces on a total of 8.8 acres. In assessing what it had bought, the city determined that one of the facilities — the Brenton Building at 1136 Alpine St. — is in “very good condition” and primed for long-term use. … Boulder is in the process of collecting public feedback on possible uses for the site. This phase, which the city is calling “vision planning,” is scheduled to be follow by a drafted site plan later this year.

Read More: City will spend $8 million to renovate an ex-Boulder Community Hospital building – Boulder Daily Camera