Hollie Rogin: Boulder’s future: who decides? 

This year, 118 of your neighbors carefully filled out extensive written boards and commissions applications. I applied for Landmarks and Planning Boards in 2016 and Planning Board in 2017. As applicants, we made ourselves available for group interviews. Many of us also met one-on-one with City Council members. Council filled vacancies at their March meeting, thanking all of us for applying and being willing to serve our community. All’s well, right?

Wrong. Boards and commissions are meant to be composed of members who represent the community as a whole, not those who represent the views of particular council members or organizations such as pro-growth and density Better Boulder (which does not have nonprofit status and does not reveal who funds it.)

Read More: Hollie Rogin: Boulder’s future: who decides? – Boulder Daily Camera

Rob Smoke: A strange rationale for a board appointment

I recently observed the Boulder City Council session where appointments were made to the Planning Board.

For one of the appointments, Bob Yates offered the following endorsement to one of the two highly pro-development candidates who were installed: “I know that he has…two children.” He didn’t simply say “I’ve met his family,” he instead said “I know that he has two children” as if that by itself were justification for his placement on the board.

Other members of council similarly had little to say about the same candidate. Someone offered, “I think he has some really good new ideas.”

Meanwhile, an individual who was slightly less pro-development was essentially removed from their seat on the Planning Board because … um … he did not have the right number of children? It might be unlikely that’s the reason, but it would make about as much sense as Bob’s reason for endorsing the new board member.

When will the residents of Boulder wake up to the fact that they are being had by moneyed interests with little or no stake in the long-term effects of rapid over-development?

Source: Rob Smoke: A strange rationale for a board appointment – Boulder Daily Camera

Nancy Haney: Lately things feel out of control

I do not often agree with Steve Pomerance writings. However his writing on March 26 spoke loudly to me.As a 40+ year resident of Boulder, I have been interested, then alarmed at the changes of late. Since my business has been closely related to growth, I have benefited from the growth in the past. Lately things have felt out of control.

His column of March 26 comforted me as it expressed so well my feelings about beautiful Boulder.

Source: Nancy Haney: Lately things feel out of control – Boulder Daily Camera

Jim Martin: Beauty of Boulder Valley has been its undoing – Boulder Daily Camera

Is this the end of Boulder as we know it?” Steve Pomerance asked in his March 26 opinion column in the Daily Camera. I can answer that: Yes, the old Boulder is dead, with recent developments delivering the final blows. This is greatly distressing to me, someone that has lived here since 1961 and who has seen the unstoppable changes that surgically remove a city’s charm.

Read More: Jim Martin: Beauty of Boulder Valley has been its undoing – Boulder Daily Camera

Paul Danish: Is this the end of Boulder as we know it? Yep

Former Boulder City Councilman Steve Pomerance had an op-ed piece in the Daily Camera last Sunday that appeared under the headline “Is this the end of Boulder as we know it?” The brief answer to the question is yes, and for the reasons Pomerance marshals. Pomerance’s thesis is that the basic charter amendments, ordinances and resolutions that have protected Boulder’s environment, character and quality of life for half a century are being systematically dismantled.

Read More: Is this the end of Boulder as we know it? Yep – Boulder Weekly

Deb Grojean: Planning Board appointments were a Tuesday night massacre

The partisan, polarizing politics of City Council’s pro-growth majority at the March 21 meeting was stupefying. Consider:

1. John Gerstle has been an exemplary, moderate voice on Planning Board. His board peers voted him chairman. Under his steady, statesmanlike leadership, the board had become more courteous, professional, and balanced.

Read More: Deb Grojean: Planning Board appointments were a Tuesday night massacre – Boulder Daily Camera