Boulder advances compromise plan to limit county control over future city expansion – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder County Planning Commission would lose veto power on key parcels; County commissioners would not.

Boulder City Council listens to citizens
Boulder Mayor Suzanne Jones, middle, and Boulder City Council members Andrew Shoemaker, left, and Sam Weaver listen. (Paul Aiken / Daily Camera Staff Photographer)

City Council members, a slight majority of whom would like to limit Boulder County’s control over future city expansion, appear to have come to some agreement on a proposed revision to the procedure by which city and county cooperate on long-range, land-use planning.

In an unofficial straw-poll vote taken late Tuesday night, the council supported a compromise that would let the Board of County Commissioners retain veto power over changes to parcels in categories known as Area II and the Area III-Planning Reserve.

However, the Boulder County Planning Commission would lose its voice in those two areas, under the straw-poll plan.

Full Story: Boulder advances compromise plan to limit county control over future city expansion – Boulder Daily Camera

Donna Pyle: Retain four-body review

I’m glad Steve Pomerance wrote his column, “Is this the end of Boulder as we know it?” (Daily Camera, March 26). He expressed my fears quite eloquently.

Will the current City Council never cease with their Build-Build-Build philosophy? Now they want to dissolve an agreement with the county so they can continue their plowing up of unoccupied lands unabated. They make a great show of soliciting citizen input, but unfortunately, they never listen.

Source: Donna Pyle: Retain four-body review – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder County commissioners hesitant to give up authority on land-use decisions – Boulder Daily Camera

Against the wishes of Boulder’s City Council, the Boulder County commissioners would like to maintain the present decision-making structure for certain parcels of land central to the city’s potential for future growth.

Read More: Boulder County commissioners hesitant to give up authority on land-use decisions – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder looks to shake bonds of county control on future development – Boulder Daily Camera

Now, with precious little land still in play, the Boulder City Council has expressed a desire to remove the two county bodies from the four-body review. If it succeeds, the process of expanding city limits — however limited the city may be in that process — could be accelerated. Most pressingly, controversial projects at Twin Lakes and CU South would see much clearer paths to approval.

Source: Boulder looks to shake bonds of county control on future development – Boulder Daily Camera

The End of the Comp Plan as we know it – Coming Soon!

City Council would like to eliminate Boulder County’s veto over certain land-use decisions

“I think the Twin Lakes debacle is Exhibit A on why the four-body review doesn’t work,” Councilman Bob Yates said.

Source: Boulder seeks decision-making autonomy at Twin Lakes, other Area II sites – Boulder Daily Camera

Mildred Martindale: Troubled by role of elected officials on Twin Lakes

After reading Dinah McKay’s exposé of the theft of the Twin Lakes open space property from us Boulder citizens, “Help save Twin Lakes open space” (Daily Camera, March 12), I have become increasingly angry with our elected officials! It seems to me it’s about time to get rid of those people who supposedly work for us, but refuse to consider our needs and opinions.

Source: Mildred Martindale: Troubled by role of elected officials on Twin Lakes – Boulder Daily Camera

Dinah McKay: Help save Gunbarrel’s Twin Lakes open space

At Twin Lakes, public scrutiny and action is needed. Do you know how Boulder County Housing Authority developers became owners of the 10-acre public property adjacent to the Twin Lakes open space at 6655 Twin Lakes Road? Was there any public review process preceding the transfer of this public land to BCHA developers? Was it a legitimate arm’s length real estate transaction?Boulder County purchased 6655 Twin Lakes Road on May 30, 2013, with public funds for $470,000. There was no public review process, public involvement or any public comment allowed before county commissioners deeded this publicly-owned property to BCHA developers on Oct. 1, 2015 for zero dollars down and a zero-interest promissory note due in 2025.

Source: Dinah McKay: Help save Gunbarrel’s Twin Lakes open space – Boulder Daily Camera