From the Editorial Advisory Board: 2017 (Part 1) – Boulder Daily Camera

If I awoke in Bizarro Boulder, where suddenly common sense reigned and I ruled supreme, here are the first steps I’d take to inject some badly needed sanity into the city’s operations: …

Declare the recently passed co-op ordinance dead on arrival and reverse the decision. This is a slow-motion Folsom Fiasco redux in the making, and ever-politically astute Lisa Morzel’s fears of recall efforts are well-founded…

Step up enforcement of vagrancy violations and wind down the funding of existing “homeless” programs that only serve to invite more problems than they solve.

Declare a total moratorium on “cash-in-lieu” buyouts by developers of their subsidized (“affordable”) housing requirements.

I would, however, keep Boulder’s new sanctuary city policy, which means I can’t be asked where I’m from (in my case, the unincorporated county). Finally! Now I can run for the City Council.

Don Wrege, donsopinion@gmail.com

Source: From the Editorial Advisory Board: 2017 (Part 1) – Boulder Daily Camera

Co-op Ordinance Passed and Finalized

City Council voted on January 3, 2017 to approve the proposed Cooperative Housing Ordinance, with no compromises on any points that were of concert to the members of BNA.

The final version of the Ordinance has been submitted by City Attorney Tom Carr: Ordinance 8119 4th Reading (2017-01-06)

Here’s video of the entire Co-op Hearing on January 3rd. Warning: contains strong language and infantile behavior:

If you want to avoid wasting time on the disturbing, but irrelevant, public comment, this next video skips over all that directly to the Council’s deliberation and vote (which actually took place on January 4th, since it started at exactly midnight):

Dan Hunter: Council should consider neighborhood impacts of co-ops 

Regarding co-ops, I do think it’s a good concept and meets the needs/desires of a certain population. However, it has to be well thought out, taking into account appropriate neighborhoods and numbers living in a household. The new ordinance will have a significant impact on a large number of taxpayers.

Source: Dan Hunter: Council should consider neighborhood impacts of co-ops – Boulder Daily Camera

Rosie Piller: Co-op ordinance goes too far – Boulder Daily Camera

First, let me say that I love the idea of cooperative living and have lived in co-ops myself. However, I believe that the current ordinance goes way too far (basically quadrupling the number of the current occupancy limits in one fell swoop) and will in fact be counterproductive (rents will rise, not fall).

Full Story: Rosie Piller: Co-op ordinance goes too far – Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder City Council approves co-op housing ordinance | KGNU News

It took nine public meetings, hundreds of public comments and thousands of emails from residents, but Boulder City Council has finally approved a new cooperative housing ordinance that many say is an experiment that will need to be monitored closely.   Before approving the new cooperative housing plan on a 7-2 vote, Boulder City Councilmembers admitted the ordinance wouldn’t please everyone. As written, the ordinance limits the number of residents per co-op to 12 in low-density neighborhoods while up to 15 residents could occupy a co-op in medium to high-density neighborhoods. The ordinance also requires that homes turned into co-ops be large enough to allow 200 square feet per person.

Source: Boulder City Council approves co-op housing ordinance | KGNU News

Co-op housing ordinance passed with NO compromise by City Council

Daily Camera (1/4/17):

After a year of deliberation, including thousands of citizen comments and four marathon public hearings, Boulder at long last finalized and approved a co-operative housing ordinance early Wednesday, bringing to a close one of the most contentious and drawn-out community debates in the city’s recent history.

Continue reading “Co-op housing ordinance passed with NO compromise by City Council”