Greenwood Village pro-growth ballot measure fails, 3 to 1

A ballot measure in a special election in Greenwood Village that would have allowed for taller buildings and denser development in the area surrounding Orchard Station failed Tuesday night.

6,092 of Greenwood Village’s approximately 15,000 residents voted in Tuesday’s election, with 1,479 voting in favor of the ballot measure and 4,613 against.

High-rises or bungalows? The battle to define L.A.’s character goes to the ballot – LA Times

Los Angeles’ version of “Growth vs. Neighborhoods” goes to the vote next week:

Los Angeles is growing up, literally, to the great discomfort of some.

To better understand the battle for the future of Los Angeles, start with a long walk down a dim tunnel beneath the Hall of Administration. In a storage room under Grand Park where the county assessor keeps its map books, the clamor over Measure S — the March 7 ballot initiative aimed at regulating development in the city — seems far away.

Source: High-rises or bungalows? The battle to define L.A.’s character goes to the ballot – LA Times

Millennials want houses in the suburbs after all, new studies find – LA Times

Most millennials want to live in the suburbs, have already started buying outside urban areas, and base their homebuying decisions mainly on affordability, two new studies say. …A pair of studies released this week suggest that the majority of millennials — the oldest of whom are about 35 — want to live in the suburbs, have already started buying outside urban areas, and base their home-buying decisions mainly on affordability.

Reports by Zillow and Harvard University break with stereotypes of America’s largest generation, namely that they prefer to rent because they favor experiences over building equity and want to live in urban environments.

Read More: Millennials want houses in the suburbs after all, new studies find – LA Times

Landlords Are Taking Over the U.S. Housing Market

As rising home prices, slow new home construction, and demographic shifts push homeownership rates to 50-year lows, the U.S. is increasingly a country of renters—and landlords.

Last year, 37 percent of homes sold were acquired by buyers who didn’t live in them, according to tax-assessment data compiled in a new report published by Attom Data Solutions and ClearCapital.com Inc.

Read more: Bloomberg.com

The High Cost of a Home Is Turning American Millennials Into the New Serfs – The Daily Beast

American greatness was long premised on the common assumption was that each generation would do better than previous one. That is being undermined for the emerging millennial generation.

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Peak Millennial? Cities Can’t Assume a Continued Boost From the Young – The New York Times

Over the next few years, demographic research shows, the growth in demand for urban living could stall.

The debate is full of contours and caveats, but it really boils down to this: Are large numbers of millennials really so enamored with city living that they will age and raise families inside the urban core, or will many of them, like earlier generations, eventually head to the suburbs in search of bigger homes and better school districts?

Full Story: Peak Millennial? Cities Can’t Assume a Continued Boost From the Young – The New York Times

San Francisco Asks: Where Have All the Children Gone? – The New York Times

San Francisco has the lowest share of children of the country’s largest cities, a longstanding trend reinforced by a tech industry that skews young and single.

A report released on Tuesday by the San Francisco Planning Department said the building boom in the city, which for the most part has introduced more studios and one-bedroom apartments, was unlikely to bring in more families. For every 100 apartments in the city sold at market rates, the San Francisco school district expects to enroll only one additional student, the report said.

Full Story: San Francisco Asks: Where Have All the Children Gone? – The New York Times